1901 HANDWRITTEN DIARY KEPT BY THIS NEW YORK STATE DAIRYMAN, RESIDING IN POTSDAM, SAINT LAWRENCE COUNTY, NY. Theodore Bradley.
1901 HANDWRITTEN DIARY KEPT BY THIS NEW YORK STATE DAIRYMAN, RESIDING IN POTSDAM, SAINT LAWRENCE COUNTY, NY.
1901 HANDWRITTEN DIARY KEPT BY THIS NEW YORK STATE DAIRYMAN, RESIDING IN POTSDAM, SAINT LAWRENCE COUNTY, NY.
1901 HANDWRITTEN DIARY KEPT BY THIS NEW YORK STATE DAIRYMAN, RESIDING IN POTSDAM, SAINT LAWRENCE COUNTY, NY.

1901 HANDWRITTEN DIARY KEPT BY THIS NEW YORK STATE DAIRYMAN, RESIDING IN POTSDAM, SAINT LAWRENCE COUNTY, NY.

1901. Original manuscript. Hardcover. The main text of this diary comprises 183pp of neat, pencilled entries, along with 21pp of memoranda and cash accounts, and the usual printed almanac-type matter. In a wallet-style binding of maroon cloth, "Excelsior Diary" in gilt on the cover. 7" x 3.5" Very Good. Item #041329

[Potsdam is some 85 miles south of Ottawa, Canada. Our diarist, Theodore Bradley, was born in New York City in 1857, married Nellie Perrin in 1879. They relocated to Potsdam, had two children, and Theodore died in 1917. Nellie passed in 1926.] Theodore writes here as a middle-aged man who works in several local milk factories, including the Ellis Factory, Parishville Center Factory. and Knapps Station Factory, all in St. Lawrence Co., NY. He is married to Nell. Theodore is involved in the process of building and staffing the Knapps factory as this diary opens. His many jobs include hiring men to work on additions, repairs, and maintenance (and occasionally assisting them); keeping the books (“figuring”, which occupies many hours per month and includes preparing “dividend checks and statements” and doing the banking chores); keeping track of the “patrons” of the factories and their investments in the factories (“they contract their milk for five years”- Feb.), and testing the milk several times a month. This latter task can be dangerous, as when, in April, he “got some milk into my mouth and after 20 minutes or more was taken very sick from the poison. Emma gave me whites of eggs and Charlie telephoned Dr….I was sick for two or three hours…[then] finished testing by Nell’s help.” // He also runs his own household farm, with help from his sons Gene (or “Genie”) and “Will”. They not only plant and harvest hay, oats, potatoes, millet and corn, but also raise hogs and cows, as well as selling butter (he is continually “making butter boxes” for storage and transport), apples, maple syrup, and calves (“sold two calves for $12”-March). Of course, he also does work on the family house and grounds, including seeing that wood is cut/drawn, ice is cut, buildings are repaired, roads are “made”, etc, Gene. in the early months of the year, usually attends school in Potsdam and comes home to work on weekends; but in September, 1901, he “decided that he will give up school until February and come home to help me” with harvesting, etc. // Theodore is a religious man, noting who went to church each Sunday (up to three times a day, including Sunday School), and what the subject of the sermon was. Temperance rears its head several times in this context, and one sermon is on the “relationship of the saloon to McKinley’s assassination”-Sept.). He also keeps abreast of news in the local towns where he frequently travels because of work-related and family duties. These include Norwood, Potsdam, Hewittville, Canton, Ogdensburg, and Sisonville. In January, he appears in Canton court as a witness during a lawsuit; and then in May, he spends a week there as a juror, hearing “the Nicholville murder case” as well as “a case of stealing…forging check…licker [liquor] case…gambling at Decalb…[and] manslaughter at Norfolk.” // He is also tangled up in legal business all spring, upon the death of his wife’s father, “Father Perrin.” The disposition of Father P’s lands and goods is contested by various relatives, and he records much palaver over Mother Perrin’s share (and relocation), the sale of the goods at auction (“sold most everything…cheap”-June), etc., along with the accompanying financial details. Eventually, the property is sold, but the Theodore and his relatives are allowed to enjoy the fruits of the fall harvest (and sell them), since the new owner won’t take possession until February, 1902. // The entries in this diary reflect the turn-of-the-century’s leaning toward modernity, while maintaining some old-fashioned technology. He mentions using the telephone many times, but also notes in April that he’s had “128 consecutive days of sleighing” as the major form of transportation, including for taking milk to the factories. There is much about buying and repairing a separator for factory use, but there’s still a lot of time spent “cutting ice” and drawing wood from the woods. // One highlight of the year is the family’s trip to Waltham, MA (and Boston), which lasts from Nov. 26-Dec. 13. In addition to visiting family, Theodore and various relatives tour Boston and see such unusual sights as the Saxonia, which he boards and notes “is to sail for London tomorrow and is to carry about 800 passengers beside a crew of 260”. He also “saw Chiquita” at the “animal show” and reports that she is “32 years old and 26 inches high. She is very pretty [and]…I shook hands with her.” ,

Price: $200.00

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